Tag Archives: masters of adult education

The terror and the thrill of teaching from a blank slate

About three years ago, a wise colleague told me that it takes three years to become a teacher and five years to become a good one. At the time, I couldn’t see that happening to me. Then a college teacher … Continue reading

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Ten steps to effective classroom listening

No doubt, at some point in our lives, some wise person has reminded us that there’s more to listening than merely opening our ears. Indeed, we know this. We understand this. But, often, we are still hearing without really listening. … Continue reading

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Technique versus self-knowledge

Innovative teaching requires the courage to take risks and to try out lessons and techniques that may fail. The worst flops are sometimes the ones that happen on the first day of class. What a way to start a relationship … Continue reading

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The power of one-on-one student-teacher meetings

As I wrap up the winter semester with my first-year Office Administration students with one-on-one mock job interviews, I’m wishing I could have met with each one in this way earlier. These mock interviews have students implementing the crash-course lessons … Continue reading

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Sharing personal lives with students creates a powerful “weave”

Online magazine columnist Leslie Harpold wrote that one of the keys to a powerful thank-you is to tell the reader how they fit into the fabric of your life. I’ve taught many writing lessons using an article that Harpold wrote … Continue reading

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Better to burn out than fade away?

Wow. Last semester was undoubtedly my best semester yet as a teacher. I pushed, challenged, cheered, and inspired my students more than ever before. As always, I gave them everything I had for the four months I had them. This … Continue reading

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Create powerful learning through integrated course design

It had to happen eventually. Eventually, I had to start reflecting on what this blog is really supposed to be about: the research I’m doing for my Masters of Adult Education. Until now, my blog has been a semi-weekly analysis … Continue reading

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Let the students do the teaching

One of the best pieces of teaching advice I received as a new St. Lawrence College instructor came from School of Business professor Tom Brennan. Our conversation took place in 2008 when I was struggling to develop diverse teaching approaches … Continue reading

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“Connection! It’s a small miracle”

Those were the words of my colleague and unofficial mentor Kathy Patterson upon reading the third set of blog assignment entries from my first-year Advertising students. “Do you realize what you have managed to accomplish with this assignment?” Kathy said … Continue reading

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Teaching—best job in the world!

One of the toughest challenges for teachers is engaging our students. With students in-class distracted by non-stop messages on their smartphones, Facebook updates on their laptops, and shorter-than-ever attention spans, it’s no wonder that educators refer to modern teaching as … Continue reading

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