Giving “thanks” to my students

Thank you, Ciera Jones and Sarah Chapman for teaching me about “phubbing,” the act of snubbing someone in favour of one’s smartphone.

thank you studentsThank you, Jason Manuge for teaching me about the evolution of video gaming from bricks-and-mortar stores to online distribution.

Thank you, Arielle Langlois for sharing your take on the power of mascots in advertising.

Thank you, Tina Ciccarelli for making me laugh on this rainy Thanksgiving Sunday by showing me that hilarious mistakes in advertising can go far beyond grammar and punctuation.

Thank you, Andrea Bedford for reminding me that prank advertisements are still alive and strong and here to stay—at least for a while.

Thank you, Brent Goff for demonstrating how social media has given new powers to media consumers, making us also media producers.

Thank you, Andrew Buist for teaching me the marketing term “getting mugged,” which is not about being held up at knife point.

Thank you, Ross Ayling for writing your “big gas” blog post on figurative language in advertising, thereby showing me that my lesson on the subject struck home last week.

And thank you to many more of my first-year Advertising Marketing Communications students for sharing with me some of your favourite class lessons from the week or advertising-related pop culture issues or social media marketing campaign stories.

In the words of American teacher-poet Robert John Meehan, “A great teacher is someone who can learn from his students, who can learn with them, and learns for them.”

I’m not claiming to be a great teacher—although I aspire to be one some day—but this is what I do every time I read and evaluate my students’ blogs. I learn from my students. I learn with them. And I think I learn for them.

In the eight-week blogging assignment in my Writing for Marketing class, students reflect on what they are learning in their classes about advertising, marketing, public relations, and media issues.

Therefore, as I evaluate their posts each week, I learn about the lessons that most interest them and what’s top of mind for today’s college advertising students.

In other words, I get to learn what they are learning—in their words.

Since I read and evaluate about 55 student blogs each week, I get to learn a lot.

So, in the spirit of this holiday Thanksgiving weekend, I give thanks to my students.

Thank you, students. You are, without doubt, my best teachers.

——-

You can learn from my students, too. Here is this week’s top 10 (or so—I’m terrible at math) list:

Ross Ayling shares how Kmart uses very figurative language in its latest video ad campaign

Ross Ayling shares how Kmart uses very figurative language in its latest video ad campaign

Ross Ayling reflects on his figurative language in advertising lesson by sharing with us a hilarious Kmart video campaign that is very “punny!”

Sarah Chapman and Ciera Jones decry how “phubbing” is endemic in western society and implore all of us to get our heads out of our smartphones and back into reality.

Tina Ciccarelli shares some hilarious advertising gaffs caused by ad placement that probably couldn’t have been anticipated—even by the best of proofreaders.

In his post about how social media users have become producers of media, Brent Goff  demonstrates punchy, intelligent writing and proves he’s mastered this assignment.

Victoria Butler celebrates a spicy new Italian dressing ad campaign that's pretty much, um, undressed

Victoria Butler celebrates a spicy new Italian dressing ad campaign that’s pretty much, um, undressed

Victoria Butler introduces us to Kraft’s new “sizzling” ad campaign for its Italian salad dressing, which uses a hunky, naked male model to spice up its commercials.

Jason Manuge makes me, for the first time, wish I owned a PC instead of a Mac. Can you say, “Cut price video games?”

Lauren Baxter introduces us to the YouTube beauty community

Lauren Baxter introduces us to the YouTube beauty community

Lauren Baxter introduces us to the world of YouTube beauty gurus and confesses that the YouTube beauty community is responsible for her addiction to beauty products.

Andrew Buist shares a new word he learned from teacher Jackie St. Pierre. Have you ever heard of “mugging” in marketing research? To learn more, read Andrew’s most recent blog post.

Dalton Hadwen tells us about a kooky Heineken social media marketing campaign that just might drop you in the middle of nowhere.

Adam went ponders if AIDA will help him with the online dating game

Adam went ponders if AIDA will help him with the online dating game

Adam Wemp experiments with the indirect persuasive message formula learned in my Writing for Advertising class (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) while writing his online dating profile and waits to see if it gets him quality responses faster.

Arielle Langlois describes how mascots are powerful way to build brand recognition. I love the way she used her image in this post. Wait………………..for it!

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About teachingteacher

Business communications instructor, journalist, corporate communications writer and media trainer ... and Masters Candidate M.Ad.Ed.
This entry was posted in Blogging, Critical Thinking, Reflective Practice, Transformative learning and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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